How Your Stable Stance Affects Your Trigger Operation In Air Pistol Shooting
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    Hello, friends,

    In the last webinar, I had discussed the importance of taking a stable stance and position. In that webinar, I had asked you a question.

    What is the relation between a stable stance and position, with your smooth trigger operation, when the sights come into aiming area?

    I had very briefly explained and answered this question in my webinar, but I figured, I needed to go a little bit deeper and make the explanation more simpler and more interesting to understand.

    When your stance is not stable, your arc of movement becomes wider, as shown in this clip. Now, this is how a beginner whose arc of movement is very wide and he takes a lot of time in trying to reduce this arc of movement.

    An expert level shooter, a top level shooter, an experienced shooter, who has a very good, stable stance and position. When his sights come into the aiming area, the arc of movement is greatly reduced and he spends very little time in reducing the arc of movement and his arc of movement, looks the way it is shown in this clip.

    Notice his arc of movement is reduced the moment his sights come into the aiming area. Now, this is an ideal situation. Even the best of shooters don’t get this kind of arc of movement, the moment the sights come into the area. But this is an ideal arc of movement.

    Now, please remember one thing that your mind can focus, or concentrate or pay attention to only one thing at a time. Therefore, when the sights come into the aiming area and you need to concentrate on your smooth trigger operation. Your mind starts jumping from the moving sights and then back to the trigger.

    From the trigger, back to the moving sights and this hopping from the sights to the trigger operation, results in a discontinuous trigger operation. Whereas your trigger operation should be smooth and continuous, till follow through.

    As a result of this stop, start, stop, start trigger operation. Because your mind gets diverted to the wide arc of movement. Eventually, the trigger operation is not smooth, it’s not continuous, and the shot can go anywhere as shown in this clip.

    Notice in this video how the trigger operation breaks. A number of times. And the shot may go anywhere. The trigger operation, as shown in the video, keeps breaking. Because your concentration, instead of being on the smooth trigger operation, smooth, continuous trigger operation, keeps getting distracted by the wide arc of movement.

    Let’s see the clip again. Now, watch how the trigger operation breaks because your attention gets diverted to the arc of movement. As a result, the shot may go anywhere.

    The second scenario is, that some beginners initially, wait for the arc of movement to reduce to their satisfaction, and then they start the trigger operation.

    When the sights become steady, then they start the trigger operation. By this time. Several seconds are past and there is a strong urge building up in your lungs to resume breathing. And this, again, diverts your attention from the trigger operation, and you want to get rid of that shot as fast as possible so you jerk the trigger as shown in this video.

    Notice how the shooter is waiting for the sights to reduce its arc of movement and then so many seconds have gone, the trigger is jerked.

    Let’s watch the video again. Because the arc of movement is taking a very, very long time. And this builds up of pressure in your lungs to resume breathing, you jerk the trigger as shown in the clip.

    So, if you have a very good, stable stance and position, your arc of movement will be reduced. And you will be able to concentrate much better on a smooth, continuous trigger operation as shown in this clip. The moment the sights come into the aiming area, you concentrate on your trigger operation. And the shot is superb.

    Notice how the trigger moves very smoothly and continuously, and it is an excellent follow through of the trigger, smooth, continuous trigger before, during and after the shot. Let’s watch the clip once again.

    Notice how the trigger starts off the moment the sights come into the area and it is very smooth, continuous before, during and after the shot. And because of an excellent follow through, the shot has gone into the 10.

    So that is the relationship between your stable stance and a smooth, continuous operation follow through.

    And between the two, your stable stance and your trigger operation, is the reduced moment. Because a stable stance and position contributes to a great extent, to reduce the arc of movement. And when your arc of movement is reduced as quickly as possible, you can then concentrate on a smooth continuous trigger operation follow through

    So that is the relationship between your stable stance and position and your smooth, continuous trigger operation when the sights come into the aiming area.

     

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